Late Bloomers!

July 28th 2016
Four Seasons

High Impact Plants for Late Summer

Late bloomers are often the unsung heroes in books and movies; however, when it comes to our garden beds, late-season perennials are overlooked early in the season by showier annuals.

Like the protagonist in nearly every John Hughes film ever made, the following plants don’t get their chance to shine until the very end of the season. Below is a compilation of our late summer perennial favorites. From July to September, these flowers regularly hold up in the heat.

Liatris spicata, AKA Blazing Star, AKA Gayfeather

Because of its small footprint and vertical stature, Liatris is an excellent choice to create fanciful pops of color throughout an established perennial bed. The purple spiked flower head opens top down, making it unique in the flower world. This plant is native to Michigan and makes an excellent cut flower.

Sedum, AKA Stonecrop

We have mentioned sedums on our blog before and for good reason. Sedums are near-fail-proof plant that has seasonal interest most of the year. Blooms range from the palest pink to deep burgundy, and foliage comes in every shade of green and maroon. Staff picks include ‘Autumn Fire’ and ‘Purple Emperor.’

Geranium ‘Rozanne’, AKA Cranesbill

Blossoming in June and continuing all summer, this low-growing ground cover is a top pick among our designers. An excellent filler plant, this flower has a spreading nature; however, don’t be afraid; this plant is a lover and not a fighter. Since it maxes out at about two feet in height, plant it at the front of your bed, or intersperse it with other favorites. Can’t find it in the store? Substitute Coral Bells. This foliage-driven plant is about the same height and comes in various hues.

Blossoming in June and continuing all summer, this low-growing ground cover is a top pick among our designers. An excellent filler plant, this flower has a spreading nature; however, don’t be afraid; this plant is a lover and not a fighter. Since it maxes out at about two feet in height, plant it at the front of your bed, or intersperse it with other favorites. Can’t find it in the store? Substitute Coral Bells. This foliage-driven plant is about the same height and comes in various hues.

Rudbeckia fulgida, AKA Black-Eyed Susan

It wouldn’t be a list of summer blooms without the ubiquitous Black-eyed Susan. There is a reason these easy-to-grow native wildflowers are planted repeatedly. With resistance to most garden pests, these are an excellent choice for beginner gardeners.

Try planting in masses or along borders to add a bit of brightness to your beds. Create winter drama by leaving the seed heads throughout the cold months for your enjoyment and that of birds. Need an alternative, try Coneflower. No longer just in purple, they come in various shades today.

Hydrangeas, Multiple Varieties

climbing hydrangea

A classic hedge and border planting, hydrangeas are an anchor to late summer garden designs. Blooms can reliably last from July into September, depending on the type of hydrangea. With so many varieties, I could write a whole post on hydrangeas alone. Office favorites include Endless Summer and Annabelle for the classic garden, Snow Queen for the naturalized garden, and Little Lime for the best of both worlds.

Contact Four Seasons to create your colorful landscape today.